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MidWeek Scene: Summer Reads for 2018

MidWeek Scene: Summer Reads for 2018

6. 13. 18

Hello all! Spring is ending soon and Summer is pretty much around the corner so I’ve been rummaging around looking for the latest books to read for the Summer of 2018. According to Melanie Yates for http://www.bestproducts.com, here are the 50 Best Summer Reading Books for 2018, but for this post, there will be only 20 or less…


Credit source: Best Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I did say 20 and here you have 20 of the 50 best. To read the rest of the article to IT’S BEACH-READ SEASON! SEE WHAT BOOKS FOR SUMMER MADE OUR LIST THIS YEAR by Melanie Yates.

 

Image source: www.bestproducts.com
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MidWeek Update: NCWN 2018 Squire Summer Writing Workshops & Killer Nashville International Writers’ Conference 2018

MidWeek Update: NCWN 2018 Squire Summer Writing Workshops & Killer Nashville International Writers’ Conference 2018

6. 6. 18

Hey! Literature peeps this is just for you…


Credit source: The Writer

 

NCWN 2018 Squire Summer Writing Workshops

Date

Thursday, July 19, 2018 – Sunday, July 22, 2018

Categories

Children’s, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Horror, Journalism, Mystery, Nonfiction, Poetry, Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult

Location

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Admission Fees

Varies

Description

The conference features workshops in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, as well as panels, readings, and open mics. The faculty includes fiction writer Elaine Neil Orr, nonfiction writer Paul Cuadros, and editor Rob Greene (Raleigh Review). Attendees will study one genre with one instructor over the course of the weekend. Registrants should be ready to handle the intense atmosphere of the workshops.

Contact Information

Charles Fiore
Charles@ncwriters.org

Website

www.ncwriters.org

 

 

 

Killer Nashville International Writers’ Conference 2018

Date

Thursday, August 23, 2018 – Sunday, August 26, 2018

Categories

Children’s, Crime/Thriller, Drama, Essay, Fantasy, Fiction, Horror, Journalism, Mystery, Nonfiction, Personal Journals, Plays, Poetry, Romance, Science Fiction, Screenwritin, Young Adult

Location

Franklin Tennessee – just south of Nashville

Admission Fees

$379 for Early Registration (deadline June 1, 2018)
$399 Regular Registration (deadline August 23, 2018) 

Discounts and scholarships are available. Please see website for details.

Description

The Killer Nashville International Writers’ Conference was created in 2006 by author/filmmaker Clay Stafford in an effort to bring together forensic experts, writers, and fans of crime and thriller literature.

Our objective is simple: to educate and empower aspiring and established writers, and connect them with other industry professionals. We pride ourselves on our intense, intimate workshops and panels, and on our close-knit community of writers.

At the conference, we try diligently to ensure that the weekend has something for every writer and lover of literature, and our sessions are structured to assist writers on multiple career levels. Our learning tracks tackle the craft of writing, the business of writing, marketing, and forensics.

Killer Nashville features nine breakout sessions for intense smaller group interaction, an authors’ bar (free for hotel guests), a moonshine and wine tasting, free agent/editor roundtable pitch sessions, a mock crime scene designed by special agents and other law enforcement professionals, cocktail receptions, the Guest of Honor Dinner and Awards Banquet, film previews, live music performances and—of course—all the great activities one can enjoy in downtown Nashville.

Contact Information

Liz Gatterer: contact@KillerNashville.com

Website

https://www.KillerNashville.com

 

 

 

Image source: unknown

Wknd Scene: Writing Contest…

May 12 / 18

Don’t get mad, but this just came into my radar. Are you able to write a short story in let’s say in two days?  The Writer has another contest for those who can throw down a short story. Read below for details…


Credit source: The Writer

 

Write a 2,000-word fictional short story using any nuance, definition, or understanding of the word “change.”

Deadline: May 15th, 2018

Grand prize: $1,000 and publication in our magazine

Word count: 2,000 words or less

Other prizes: Our second-place winner will receive $500 and publication on our website, writermag.com; our third-place winner will receive $250 and publication on writermag.com as well.

I know, I know…it’s short notice, but if you can write 2,000 words with the understanding of the word “change”, you may want to enter!

 

Image source: The Writer & Tweed Editing

National Poetry Month: Lucille Clifton

April 28 / 18

National Poetry Month folks! The last featured poet and poems and I found some great poems by Lucille Clifton. Take a look at these…


Credit source: Poem Hunter

Homage To My Hips – by Lucille Clifton

these hips are big hips.
they need space to
move around in.
they don’t fit into little
petty places. these hips
are free hips.
they don’t like to be held back.
these hips have never been enslaved,
they go where they want to go
they do what they want to do.
these hips are mighty hips.
these hips are magic hips.
i have known them
to put a spell on a man and
spin him like a top

 

Moonchild – by Lucille Clifton

whatever slid into my mother’s room that
late june night, tapping her great belly,
summoned me out roundheaded and unsmiling.
is this the moon, my father used to grin.
cradling me? it was the moon
but nobody knew it then.

the moon understands dark places.
the moon has secrets of her own.
she holds what light she can.

we girls were ten years old and giggling
in our hand-me-downs. we wanted breasts,
pretended that we had them, tissued
our undershirts. jay johnson is teaching
me to french kiss, ella bragged, who
is teaching you? how do you say; my father?

the moon is queen of everything.
she rules the oceans, rivers, rain.
when I am asked whose tears these are
I always blame the moon.

 

Admonitions – by Lucille Clifton

boys
i don’t promise you nothing
but this
what you pawn
i will redeem
what you steal
i will conceal
my private silence to
your public guilt
is all i got

girls
first time a white man
opens his fly
like a good thing
we’ll just laugh
laugh real loud my
black women

children
when they ask you
why is your mama so funny
say
she is a poet
she don’t have no sense

Hope enjoyed these poems for this month because I have enjoyed them the most. Enjoy the rest of your weekend, be always blessed.

Image source: Wikipedia

Wknd Scene: Santa Barbara Writers Conference

April 28 / 18

Hello! The final weekend of April has come. The Santa Barbara Writers Conference is coming in June of this year. For those of you who may find this interesting, you still have a chance of registering. Here are the details from their website…


Credit source: Santa Barbara Writers

Santa Barbara Writers Conference June 17-22, 2018

Improve your craft • Find your tribe • Make lifelong connections


Since 1972 writers from around the world have gathered each June at the Santa Barbara Writers Conference to rub elbows with fellow storytellers, celebrate well-known authors, and network with publishing professionals. 

Join us beachside for an intensive, weeklong experience dedicated to the craft of writing. Workshops cover literary fiction, mystery, sci-fi, memoir, creative nonfiction, travel writing, poetry, screenwriting, and marketing.

The June 17-22, 2018 conference includes:

  • 5 full days of workshops led by 36 talented teachers

  • 5 keynote presentations by successful authors

  • Afternoon speakers and panel discussions

  • Book signings with author-speakers

  • Opening Night Banquet

  • Poolside Cocktail Reception

  • Awards Banquet

  • Optional one-on-one manuscript consultations

  • Registration for appointments with agents

  • A week of networking, support, and camaraderie

Go to www.sbwriters.com to register, and to know more about speakers, panels, and scheduling.

 

Image source: Dreamstime.com & California Beaches

 

National Poetry Month: Juan Felipe Herrera

April 21 / 18

National Poetry Month! Time to read and get inspired by great poetry with Juan Felipe Herrera.


Credit source: Poetry Foundation

Blood on the Wheel

     Ezekiel saw the wheel,
way up in the middle of the air.
TRADITIONAL GOSPEL SONG

Blood on the night soil man en route to the country prison
Blood on the sullen chair, the one that holds you with its pleasure
Blood inside the quartz, the beauty watch, the eye of the guard
Blood on the slope of names & the tattoos hidden
Blood on the Virgin, behind the veils,
Behind—in the moon angel’s gold oracle hair
                    What blood is this, is it the blood of the worker rat?
                    Is it the blood of the clone governor, the city maid?
                    Why does it course in s’s & z’s?
Blood on the couch, made for viewing automobiles & face cream
Blood on the pin, this one going through you without any pain
Blood on the screen, the green torso queen of slavering hearts
Blood on the grandmother’s wish, her tawdry stick of Texas
Blood on the daughter’s breast who sews roses
Blood on the father, does anyone remember him, bluish?
                    Blood from a kitchen fresco, in thick amber strokes
                    Blood from the baby’s right ear, from his ochre nose
                    What blood is this?
Blood on the fender, in the sender’s shoe, in his liquor sack
Blood on the street, call it Milagro Boulevard, Mercy Lanes #9
Blood on the alien, in the alligator jacket teen boy Juan
                    There is blood, there, he says
                    Blood here too, down here, she says
                    Only blood, the Blood Mother sings
Blood driving miniature American queens stamped into rage
Blood driving rappers in Mercedes blackened & whitened in news
Blood driving the snare-eyed professor searching for her panties
Blood driving the championship husband bent in Extreme Unction
                   Blood of the orphan weasel in heat, the Calvinist farmer in wheat
                   Blood of the lettuce rebellion on the rise, the cannery worker’s prize
Blood of the painted donkey forced into prostitute zebra,
Blood of the Tijuana tourist finally awake & forced into pimp sleep again
It is blood time, Sir Terminator says,
It is blood time, Sir Simpson winks,
It is blood time, Sir McVeigh weighs.
                   Her nuclear blood watch soaked, will it dry?
                   His whitish blood ring smoked, will it foam?
                   My groin blood leather roped, will it marry?
                   My wife’s peasant blood spoked, will it ride again?
Blood in the tin, in the coffee bean, in the maquila oración
Blood in the language, in the wise text of the market sausage
Blood in the border web, the penal colony shed, in the bilingual yard
                    Crow blood blues perched on nothingness again
                    fly over my field, yellow-green & opal
                    Dog blood crawl & swish through my sheets
Who will eat this speckled corn?
Who shall be born on this Wednesday war bed?
Blood in the acid theater, again, in the box office smash hit
Blood in the Corvette tank, in the crack talk crank below
Blood boat Navy blood glove Army ventricle Marines
in the cookie sex jar, camouflaged rape whalers
Roam & rumble, investigate my Mexican hoodlum blood
                    Tiny blood behind my Cuban ear, wine colored & hushed
                    Tiny blood in the death row tool, in the middle-aged corset
                    Tiny blood sampler, tiny blood, you hush up again, so tiny
Blood in the Groove Shopping Center,
In blue Appalachia river, in Detroit harness spleen
Blood in the Groove Virus machine,
In low ocean tide, in Iowa soy bean
Blood in the Groove Lynch mob orchestra,
South of Herzegovina, south, I said
Blood marching for the Immigration Patrol, prized & arrogant
Blood spawning in the dawn break of African Blood Tribes, grimacing
& multiple—multiple, I said
Blood on the Macho Hat, the one used for proper genuflections
Blood on the faithful knee, the one readied for erotic negation
Blood on the willing nerve terminal, the one open for suicide
Blood at the age of seventeen
Blood at the age of one, dumped in a Greyhound bus
Blood mute & autistic & cauterized & smuggled Mayan
& burned in border smelter tar
                    Could this be yours? Could this item belong to you?
                    Could this ticket be what you ordered, could it?
          Blood on the wheel, blood on the reel
          Bronze dead gold & diamond deep. Blood be fast.
Juan Felipe Herrera, “Blood on the Wheel” from Border-crosser with a Lamborghini Dream. Copyright © 1999 by Juan Felipe Herrera.  Reprinted by permission of University of Arizona Press.
Source: Border-crosser with a Lamborghini Dream (University of Arizona Press, 1999)

In the Cannery the Porpoise Soul

In the cannery the porpoise soul
& the shadow fins of spirit boats lie awake
the hundred hooks & flying reels
one harpoon
& the silver fleshing in the nets
the mayor is waiting/counting scales
dreaming new quotas & tuna coasts
(under the table blood & payrolls
swim to the shores on a crucifix of oil)
in the cannery the porpoise soul
steals a dagger forthe engines throat
tuna fins etch an X
on the green stone of the ships floor
there are documents with worker sweat
files & rolled sleeve salt
a spear of sails & anchor years
(lost)
inside the shoulders & against the ropes
(somehow)
a policy gunned the waves back
before the porpoise sea was born
“In the Cannery the Porpoise Soul” from Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems by Juan Felipe Herrera. Copyright © 2008 Juan Felipe Herrera. Reprinted by permission of the University of Arizona Press. This material is protected from unauthorized downloading and distribution.
Source: Half of the World in Light (The University of Arizona Press, 2008)

War Voyeurs

for Clara Fraser

I do not understand why men make war.
Is it because artillery is the most stoic example
of what flesh can become?
Is it because the military plan is the final map
drawn by the wisest hunter?
Is it because the neutron ray is the invincible finger
no one will disobey?
or
Is it because the flood of blood is the proper penance
workers must pay for failing tribute at the prescribed
hour?
I do not understand why men make war.
Is it because when death is multiple and expanding, there
among the odd assemblages, arbitrary and unnamed, there
among the shrivelled mountains, distorted and hollow, there
among the liquid farms and cities, cold and sallow, there
among the splintered bones of children, women, men and cattle
there and only there, the eerie head of power is being born?
Is it because submission is the only gesture to be rehearsed,
to be dressed, to be modeled, to be cast, to be chosen
in the one and only one drama to be staged in the theater of
this world, where everyone must act with the backbone humbled
with the mascara of bondage, with the lipstick of slaves under
the light of gentle assassination with applause piercing the ground
forever?
or
Is it because war is the secret room of all things to be kept
sealed and contained, to be conquered and renamed woman
enclosed by an empire of walls, vaults, hinges and locks with
the hot key that men and only men must possess for an eternal
evening to visit and contemplate, to snap open a favorite window
and gaze at the calibrated murder as lovers of beauty?

“War Voyeurs” from Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems by Juan Felipe Herrera. Copyright © 2008 Juan Felipe Herrera. Reprinted by permission of the University of Arizona Press. This material is protected from unauthorized downloading and distribution.

Source: Half of the World in Light (The University of Arizona Press, 2008)

Enjoy the rest of your weekend, be blessed!

 

Image source: Los Angeles Times

Wednz Scene: Writing Contests

Wednz Scene: Writing Contests

April 18 / 18

Hello everyone…it’s Wednesday and looks like this month is halfway over. Hard to believe, but it’s happening. I’m always searching for contests to share with y’all and if there are writers out there who would love to put their story or poetry out there, here is your chance. Thanks to The Writer, they have contests you can enter to get your work noticed.


Credit source: The Writer

The Coming Change

Write a 2,000-word fictional short story using any nuance, definition, or understanding of the word “change.”

Deadline: May 15th, 2018

Grand prize: $1,000 and publication in our magazine

Word count: 2,000 words or less

Other prizes: Our second-place winner will receive $500 and publication on our website, writermag.com; our third-place winner will receive $250 and publication on writermag.com as well.

Not the writing contest for you? Sign up for our newsletter to be the first to hear when we launch a new one.

Click Here to Enter

 

 

2018 Nightjar Review Poetry Contest

Deadline

Monday, April 30, 2018

Categories

Entry Fees

Submit 1 poem for $6, or 3 poems for $15. No entry limits.

Prizes

Winner receives $200 and publication. Two finalists will also receive publication.

Description

2018 Judge: Jericho Brown
Contest submission window: January 30th to April 30th, 2018

Contest Judge: JERICHO BROWN is the recipient of a Whiting Writers Award and fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the National Endowment for the Arts. His poems have appeared in The New Republic, The New Yorker, and Best American Poetry. His first book, Please (New Issues 2008), won the American Book Award, and his second book, The New Testament (Copper Canyon 2014), won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and was named one of the best books of the year by Library Journal, Coldfront, and the Academy of American Poets. He is an associate professor in English and creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta.
Please submit one single poem ($6), a packet of three poems ($15), or any additional poem over a packet of three ($5) in a .doc or .docx file.
$200 cash prize + publication in Nightjar Review will be awarded to the winner.
All entries will also be considered for publication in Nightjar Review. The top two finalists are guaranteed publication.
All submissions must be anonymous: no name or contact information should appear on the poem. Entries must be submitted via Submittable. You may enter simultaneously submitted work as long as you notify us if the work is accepted elsewhere.
1st round of judging will be performed by Nightjar Review Editors and Readers. Finalists (approximately 10 to 12 poems) will then be forwarded to the Contest Judge for the final round of judging.
Winner will be selected by October 30th, 2018, along with two finalists at the judge’s discretion.
Entrants not selected as one of the 10-12 finalists will be notified of contest results and of the editors’ decision about publication of their entries by September 30th, 2018.
Winner and two finalists will be publicly announced by October 30th, 2018.

Contact Information

nightjarreview@gmail.com

Website

http://nightjarreview.com/2018-nightjar-review-poetry-contest.html

 

 

2-4-2 Poetry Contest

Deadline

Monday, May 7, 2018

Categories

Entry Fees

$9.95 to enter this and all contests at FanStory.com

Prizes

$100 Cash Prize

Description

A “2-4-2” is a poem that has three lines. The syllable count is 2-4-2. So the first line has two syllables. The second line has four. The third line has two syllables again. You can write about anything but keep the syllable count in mind while writing.

Contact Information

FanStory.com

Website

http://www.fanstory.com/contestdetails.jsp?id=104802

 

There are more contests. Go to http://www.writermag.com for articles, writing resources, and prompts. Enjoy your Wednesday, be blessed.

 

Image source: unknown

National Poetry Month / Phenomenal Woman & Caged Bird by Maya Angelou

April 6 / 18

Hey…it’s Friday and I did almost forget that this month is National Poetry Month. This month, I will post poetry from such poetry legends like Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, Emily Dickenson, E.E. Cummings, and Maya Angelou. Speaking of Ms. Angelou, we just celebrated her birthday recently. She would’ve been 90 years old. Here are a few of her poems that are my favorites…


Credit Source: Poetry Foundation

 

Phenomenal Woman

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size
But when I start to tell them,
They think I’m telling lies.
I say,
It’s in the reach of my arms,
The span of my hips,
The stride of my step,
The curl of my lips.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.
I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.
Then they swarm around me,
A hive of honey bees.
I say,
It’s the fire in my eyes,
And the flash of my teeth,
The swing in my waist,
And the joy in my feet.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.
Men themselves have wondered
What they see in me.
They try so much
But they can’t touch
My inner mystery.
When I try to show them,
They say they still can’t see.
I say,
It’s in the arch of my back,
The sun of my smile,
The ride of my breasts,
The grace of my style.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.
Now you understand
Just why my head’s not bowed.
I don’t shout or jump about
Or have to talk real loud.
When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
the palm of my hand,
The need for my care.
’Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Maya Angelou, “Phenomenal Woman” from And Still I Rise. Copyright © 1978 by Maya Angelou. Used by permission of Random House, an imprint, and division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved.

Source: The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou (Random House Inc., 1994)

Caged Bird

A free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wing
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.
But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.
The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.
The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn
and he names the sky his own
But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.
The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.
Maya Angelou, “Caged Bird” from Shaker, Why Don’t You Sing? Copyright © 1983 by Maya Angelou. Used by permission of Random House, an imprint, and division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved.
Source: The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou (Random House Inc., 1994)

Enjoy the rest of your weekend, be blessed always!

 

Image source: League of Canadian Poets