All posts tagged: Harlem

Artscene Newsletter Weekend: Flux Art Fair

April 25, 2015 Hello everybody…weekend is staying with us for a while and it’s time to check up on what’s going on in the world of creativity. Art fairs are coming and here is one you need to see about.  FLUX ART FAIR MAY 14 – 17, 2015 / HARLEM, NEW YORK PRESS & VIP / VERNISSAGE MAY 13, 2015  Corn Exchange Building / NW Corner of 125 St. Park Ave from the website: A contemporary art fair in the culturally rich community of Harlem.  FLUX Art Fair is a dynamic artistic platform engaging an international community of collectors and those who simply appreciate art to discover artists and discover the vitality of Harlem. Driven by curators collaborating with artists, FLUX Fair contributes to the vibrancy of Harlem by expanding the scene beyond the walls of the fair, partnering with cultural institutions and creating opportunity for rising Harlem artists within the fair.  Guest Curators select lead artists to present significant signature works linking emerging artists to a broader spectrum of art collectors. Artists and curators respond to the curatorial theme: “The …

ESQUISSES REPORTS: THE BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT

February 22, 2014 Hello! As promised, Esquisses reports on The Black Arts Movement or BAM. I’ve heard about the Harlem Renaissance, but not the Black Arts Movement. Described by Time magazine as the “single most controversial moment in the history of African-American literature-possibly in American literature as a whole.” If Harlem Renaissance was the tip of the iceberg, the Black Arts Movement was an explosion. It gave African-Americans even more power to fully express themselves and they began to get more creative in literature and art….creating their own magazines, journals, art institutions and publishing houses, literary and theatre groups. Black Arts is the artistic branch of the Black Power movement. After the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, a man by the name of Everett LeRoi Jones, who later changed his name to Amiri Baraka in 1967, an activist, poet, and playwriter moved to Harlem. Jones became very critical of the of pacifist and integrationist attitudes of the  Civil Rights Movement.  His poem, 1965’s  “Black Art“, was considered to be the major poetic manifesto of …