Day: October 21, 2017

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe

October 21 / 17 I’ve posted a few works of Edgar Allan Poe and I’m going to do it again this year. Here are a few short videos of some of his most famous and not so famous works….. Aaron Quinn     Edwin Leon     Jean & Tim ENG Hope you enjoyed these as much as I did. Enjoy the rest of your weekend, be blessed.     image source: bio.com   Advertisements

Weekend Scene: Denver Art Week

October 21 / 17 Hey again….Second, Denver Art Week, which will be happening on November 3-11, 2017. I saw this while I was getting yesterday’s post for @ The Event ready. Here are some of the highlights….. Credit source: http://www.denver.org Denver Arts Week is an nine-day celebration of all things art in The Mile High City, featuring more than 300 events at a wide variety of art galleries, museums, theaters and concert halls, many of which are deeply discounted. This year’s Denver Arts Week takes place Nov. 3-11, 2017.  PROGRAMS Know Your Arts First Friday Free Night at the Museums Denver’s On Stage Family Friendly Hidden Gems Lots of events taking place such as 14er Film Fest, 2 for 1 Admission to Listen/Hear 101 – Decoding Classical & Baroque, Broken Down, and many other events during Denver Art Week. Free Night at the Museums is where Denver’s best museums are open late and admission is free…yes FREE. You’ll also experience the Denver Film Festival, which takes place Nov. 1-12 and Breakin’ Convention, Nov. 4-5, the world’s …

Wknd Scene: Book Review

October 21 / 17 Hey! It’s the weekend and I have three things to pass along to you today. First, a book review from Literary Hub. Three books that are the rave is Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders, Whatever Happened to Interracial Love by Kathleen Collins and The Girls by Emma Cline.   Thomas Mallon, The New Yorker – “Saunders does a fine job—and has a fine time—quickening his little necropolis to literary life … Although readers may feel that Lincoln in the Bardohas little in common with the author’s dystopian short stories, there’s actually quite a lot of similarity in preoccupation and technique. Saunders often pays imaginative attention to corporations, bureaucracies, and nomenclature, and he has a predilection for creepy theme parks…In Saunders’s hands, Oak Hill, too, is a kind of theme park, with various rules and precincts and spectacles, as well as opportunities for the author’s parodic gifts … Even with this granular structure and its comic interludes, the book gathers a satisfying momentum, enough to reveal what Saunders has called, in …