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Creative Close-Up: Art Tips of the Sharing Kind…

Creative Close-Up: Art Tips of the Sharing Kind…

Feb. 27 / 17 

Hey again! As most of you know, I like to show people the best in art education, websites, and what not. I found this article from Artsy Shark by guest blogger Adam Eisenstat titled, How to Write a Compelling Artist Statement. It’s worth the read, this may be a great benefit….


cred: adam eisenstat & artsy shark

How to Write a Compelling Artist Statement

by Artsy Shark guest blogger Adam Eisenstat

Why is an artist statement important?

An artist statement is a marketing piece designed to make someone interested in your work. A good artist statement helps make an artist and his/her work more compelling.

Many artists believe their work speaks for itself, which is true to an extent. But a strong written overview/explanation of what you do—emphasizing key aspects of your work and, if relevant, your life—can expand and even enhance the work in important ways.

I’ve written materials for many artists working in a wide variety of styles and genres. One artist statement I did illustrates particularly well how this standard promotional piece can really complement the work. The artist works in encaustics (wax paintings), and she’s a psychotherapist. Her paintings are very colorful and abstract. To look at them, you probably wouldn’t know that memory is a major theme of her art, and you certainly wouldn’t know that she’s a psychotherapist. But this information is crucial to her work, and knowing it clearly enhances the viewer’s understanding.

What makes a good artist statement?

Clarity. You should get to the point and be thorough about your art, but not exhaustive.

There’s always more you can say about your work (since you know everything about it), but saying too much can muddle your message.

Brevity. An artist statement should be concise. Rare is the statement that’s more than 500 words (one page, single-spaced). You have to assume that most people who see your statement will only read two or three paragraphs (if that), which is why the key information should be at the top. Keep in mind: an artist statement is a work of publicity, not scholarship or explication.

Focus. Initially, before even thinking about the specifics of your statement, you should ask yourself: What am I trying to accomplish as an artist; who am I trying to reach? This is the strategic dimension of the statement—it requires that you clarify your goals, and then write about your art accordingly, to serve those goals.

What information should be included in an artist statement?

Your statement should contain only that information you consider most important—to your art and to your goals. Stick to the basics.

Art theory, jargon, and complex ideas should be used sparingly. What if your art is genuinely complex and/or rooted in theory? That’s fine, but in your statement you should just hint at these ideas and complexities; provide a basic outline.

Here are some examples of information to include:

* Basic concept of the work/series

* Major themes, primary subject matter/imagery

* Process/methodology for creating your work

* Materials used (paint type, colors, dimensions, etc.).

* How your work is different from other artists using similar materials/similar approach

* Compositional philosophy/conceptual approach

* Influences/current inspirations

* Overarching message of your work, basic philosophy, etc.

What autobiographical elements should be included in the statement?

This leads to another question: What importance do autobiographical elements play in your work?

An artist statement should be light on personal information (which can be included in your resume or in a separate bio, if necessary). An exception to this would be if your biography—personal details of your life—are directly relevant to your work. In that case, you might want to include more autobiographical information than someone who does not overtly draw from his/her life as a basis for their art. Of course every artist draws on his/her life experience, but a lot of those details aren’t necessarily relevant and can be left out.

Some final words

Many artists approach self-promotion with dread—it may not be natural for them, and they would really just prefer to work on their art. The biggest artists don’t usually have to worry about the details of their marketing, but if you’re like most artists you probably don’t have that luxury, so you’ll have to do much if not all of your own promotion. It doesn’t have to be such a chore, though; it can be enriching and actually help you understand your own work better. And ultimately, the point is to get your work out there and advance your career. You can make promoting your work creative and personally rewarding.

 

I told you it was worth a read. I hope that Mr. Eisenstat’s article leaves you with lessons to tackle self-promotion. Enjoy your Monday, be blessed!

To know a bit more about Adam Eisenstat, you can go to www.linkedin.com/in/adameisenstat/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

featured image: unknown

 

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2017 Oscar Winners

2017 Oscar Winners

Feb. 27 / 17

I didn’t watch, but I did keep track of who won. Here are the winners for this year’s 89th Academy Awards, well the categories that I’m most interested in….


cred: oscars.org

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

WINNER 

CASEY AFFLECK

Manchester by the Sea

NOMINEES

ANDREW GARFIELD

Hacksaw Ridge

RYAN GOSLING

La La Land

VIGGO MORTENSEN

Captain Fantastic

DENZEL WASHINGTON

Fences

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

WINNER

MAHERSHALA ALI

Moonlight

NOMINEES

JEFF BRIDGES

Hell or High Water

LUCAS HEDGES

Manchester by the Sea

DEV PATEL

Lion

MICHAEL SHANNON

Nocturnal Animals

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

WINNER

EMMA STONE

La La Land

NOMINEES

ISABELLE HUPPERT

Elle

RUTH NEGGA

Loving

NATALIE PORTMAN

Jackie

MERYL STREEP

Florence Foster Jenkins

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

WINNER

VIOLA DAVIS

Fences

NOMINEES

NAOMIE HARRIS

Moonlight

NICOLE KIDMAN

Lion

OCTAVIA SPENCER

Hidden Figures

MICHELLE WILLIAMS

Manchester by the Sea

DIRECTING

WINNER

LA LA LAND

Damien Chazelle

NOMINEES

ARRIVAL

Denis Villeneuve

HACKSAW RIDGE

Mel Gibson

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

Kenneth Lonergan

MOONLIGHT

Barry Jenkins

DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)

WINNER

O.J.: MADE IN AMERICA

Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow

NOMINEES

FIRE AT SEA

Gianfranco Rosi and Donatella Palermo

I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO

Raoul Peck, Rémi Grellety, and Hébert Peck

LIFE, ANIMATED

Roger Ross Williams and Julie Goldman

13TH

Ava DuVernay, Spencer Averick, and Howard Barish

DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)

WINNER

THE WHITE HELMETS

Orlando von Einsiedel and Joanna Natasegara

NOMINEES

EXTREMIS

Dan Krauss

4.1 MILES

Daphne Matziaraki

JOE’S VIOLIN

Kahane Cooperman and Raphaela Neihausen

WATANI: MY HOMELAND

Marcel Mettelsiefen and Stephen Ellis

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

WINNER

THE SALESMAN

Iran

NOMINEES

LAND OF MINE

Denmark

A MAN CALLED OVE

Sweden

TANNA

Australia

TONI ERDMANN

Germany

BEST PICTURE

WINNER

MOONLIGHT

Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner, and Jeremy Kleiner, Producers

NOMINEES

ARRIVAL

Shawn Levy, Dan Levine, Aaron Ryder and David Linde, Producers

FENCES

Scott Rudin, Denzel Washington and Todd Black, Producers

HACKSAW RIDGE

Bill Mechanic and David Permut, Producers

HELL OR HIGH WATER

Carla Hacken and Julie Yorn, Producers

HIDDEN FIGURES

Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams and Theodore Melfi, Producers

LA LA LAND

Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz, and Marc Platt, Producers

LION

Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Angie Fielder, Producers

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

Matt Damon, Kimberly Steward, Chris Moore, Lauren Beck and Kevin J. Walsh, Producers

Hope you enjoyed watching the Oscars and I’m happy that Viola Davis, Mahershala Ali, and the film Moonlight won. Oh, I’m sure you watched this too…..

featured image: Odessa Review